Final Fantasy XV - General News Thread

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Jenova

Keyblade Master
Oct 28, 2013
729
583
Everyone is entitled to do as he or she pleases. I choose just not to support horrible practices like Denuvo. DRM is one thing. Invasive and performance hindering DRM is another. There's a better way for consumers to be satisfied and for publishers to protect their bottom line. Just not like this.
 
Why not digitally get it from Steam to begin with? Or does Steam not have it?
I presume he wants the physical edition for collecting purposes. Though what might happen is if they use the same method they used with NieR: Automata is that he has to insert the Disc and then use a menu to generate the Steam code. My copy of Final Fantasy Type-0 though has a Steam code inside.
 
Likes: CloudBuster
Feb 19, 2018
582
1,108
29
I presume he wants the physical edition for collecting purposes. Though what might happen is if they use the same method they used with NieR: Automata is that he has to insert the Disc and then use a menu to generate the Steam code. My copy of Final Fantasy Type-0 though has a Steam code inside.
Ah ok, makes sense in that case I suppose.
 

Paperchampion23

Warrior of Light
Oct 1, 2016
1,217
1,534
28
@Jenova What must i see here? And well, compared Serious Sam 3, which can run even on my shitty note which i gave my little brother. Not a good example
You are entirely missing the point. It's a perfect example to prevent pirating. Serious Sam 3 adds in an unkillable/broken enemy that ruins the game for you if it detects any sort of pirated copy or method.

DRM programs are absolutely useless. All developers need to do is just break the game (their own form of DRM) in some stupid way (prevent the user from attacking/make enemies unkillable, ect) to prevent pirating measures, not employ an anti-pirating program which does nothing for you when you legally bought the game already.
 

Lord_Ham_Mork

SOLDIER Second Class
Feb 23, 2018
344
587
29
You are entirely missing the point. It's a perfect example to prevent pirating. Serious Sam 3 adds in an unkillable/broken enemy that ruins the game for you if it detects any sort of pirated copy or method.

DRM programs are absolutely useless. All developers need to do is just break the game (their own form of DRM) in some stupid way (prevent the user from attacking/make enemies unkillable, ect) to prevent pirating measures, not employ an anti-pirating program which does nothing for you when you legally bought the game already.
Probably it's easier to mod this so the inmortality is removed than breaking Denuvo.
But seeing what happened...maybe it will be a good idea to do this in this case.
 

Storm

Warrior of Light
Oct 26, 2013
3,351
6,012
30
Switzerland
https://lokton.tumblr.com/tagged/Final-Fantasy-XV

the magazine gladio loves to read


( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

the cards from platinum demo/tent


it reads "Fabula Nova Crystallis" on the red card, and i think "Etro" on the first one (yeah each one has a different mark, first is Etro, second Pulse and third Lindzei, all written in their respective alphabet); this is the same deck of cards used in XIII-2.

funny that the lady in white (guess that's one representation of Etro) is so alike to ghost Luna.

edit:

here's a possible translation for each card if you're interested.
 
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Jubileus

Warrior of Light
Oct 7, 2016
1,651
1,369
What is this Denuvo business?

Sometimes it truly sucks to be ignorant about technology lol.

Anyone care to fill me in? Is it something really bad?
 
Feb 19, 2018
36
39
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What is this Denuvo business?

Sometimes it truly sucks to be ignorant about technology lol.

Anyone care to fill me in? Is it something really bad?
It’s an anti piracy measure that has very little impact on players, but has big benefits for developers and publishers. However because gamers are entitled its a massive issue.
 
Likes: Lord_Ham_Mork

Alekzan

ShinRa SOLDIER
Jan 7, 2017
167
138
@Jubileus Im curious myself, but havent found an answer yet. Only that: SE sucks, SE f*** themselves, Tabata traitor and liar, Im going to refund the game and will wait when those chinese pirates will crack the game.
People dont want accept that to publish a big AAA game on PC, they(companies) need to have somekind sense of security.
 
Likes: Lord_Ham_Mork
Probably it's easier to mod this so the inmortality is removed than breaking Denuvo.
Well, not really. Rime, an indie puzzle adventure game which used Denuvo for DRM protection was cracked within merely five days of release and both players and testers as well as the cracker had the following to say:

The issue in question is loading and game performance. According to Baldman, Denuvo checks for numerous “triggers” when the game is loaded, to ensure that it is a legitimate copy of the game. Baldman said these checks also occur during gameplay with dozens of triggers being called upon per second of gameplay, accumulating “millions” of checks as playtime increased. This process allegedly slows down the game and negatively impacts performance and increases load times.

While we cannot concretely prove the two are related, players have indeed noticed similar issues as the ones described by Baldman. A thread on NeoGaf, for example, looks at the game’s performance and offers tips for maintaining a consistent framerate. My colleague Nathan Grayson, who offered impressions of the game, also noted that the game’s initial load times are quite long.
(Source: Pirates Say Rime's DRM Slows Down The Game, But Denuvo Denies It [UPDATE], Heather Alexandra for Kotaku.com; June 1, 2017)

The industry itself has also been rather direct about the fact that DRM doesn't really stop piracy, going as far back as 2012 when Marcin Iwinski, CEO of CD Projekt Red had the following to say:

First of all let me dispel the myth about DRM protecting anything. The truth is it does not work. It’s as simple as that. The technology which is supposed to protect games against illegal copying is cracked within hours of the release of every single game. So, that’s wasted money and development just to implement it. But that’s not the worst part. DRM, in most cases, requires users to enter serial numbers, validate his or her machine, and be connected to the Internet while they authenticate - and possibly even when they play the game they bought. Quite often the DRM slows the game down, as the wrapper around the executable file is constantly checking if the game is being legally used or not. That is a lot the legal users have to put up with, while the illegal users who downloaded the pirated version have a clean--and way more functional!--game. It seems crazy, but that’s how it really works. So if you are asking me how do I see the future of DRM in games, well, I do not see any future for DRM at all.
(Source: 'The Truth Is, It Doesn't Work' - CD Projekt On DRM by Daniel Nye Griffiths for Forbes.com; May 18, 2012)

Similar statements were made by Ubisofts VP of digital sales, Chris Early in 2014:

"I don't want us in a position where we're punishing a paying player for what a pirate can get around. Anything is going to be able to be pirated given enough time and enough effort to get in there. So the question becomes, what do we create as services, or as benefits, and the quality of the game, that will just have people want to pay for it?"

To fight piracy, Early explained that Ubisoft needs to not only focus on making better, more compelling games, but also ensure that these games have more online services (which are not available to pirates) baked into them.
(Source: Ubisoft: DRM Can't Stop Piracy by Eddie Makuch for Gamespot; June 20, 2014)

The above article also mentions that Ubisoft had removed their always-online DRM shortly prior to its publishing due to players complaining about the game being unplayable because of - amongst other things - loss of internet connectivity.

Even people from Denuvo (the company producing the eponymous DRM software) state that their measures are only temporary and not infallible:
“The simple reason why Denuvo Anti Tamper was removed from Doom was because it had accomplished its purpose by keeping the game safe from piracy during the initial sales window,”[..]“The protection on Doom held up for nearly four months, which is an impressive accomplishment for such a high-profile game.”
[..]
“We don’t position Denuvo Anti Tamper as being uncrackable,”[..]“No anti piracy solution is. However, our goal is to keep each title safe from piracy during the crucial initial sales window when most of the sales are made.”
(Source: Denuvo Says Doom Dropped Their Anti-Piracy Tech Because It Got The Job Done by Nathan Grayson for Kotaku.com; December 16, 2016)

As a matter of fact, some games (including the aforementioned Rime) dropped Denuvo protection, some of their own volition, but most after the DRM was cracked. And, to make this come around to Final Fantasy, a quick research revealed that a cracking team by the name of "CONSPIR4CY" managed to put out an illegal non-Denuvo release of Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age on PC within seventeen days of its release on digital distribution systems.

So, to use a sentence one will have heard quite often when it comes to DRM and cracking - it's not a matter of "if", but a matter of "when".

@Jubileus Denuvo is an "anti-tamper technology" that is used to protect PC games from being pirated and, as seen above, has been criticised for making games perform poorly and is thusly frowned upon.

(Can a mod move this whole DRM thingamajic to a separate thread? I think this warrants debate but ought to not derail the General News Thread any further.)