How RPG do you like your games?

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Oct 4, 2013
47
13
#23
Probably a difficult question to answer at the moment :/
I guess I like magic, special attacks, form upgrade, shopping and worldmaps.
 
#25
I think RPG elements have a lot of potential to raise the overall quality of a game. As OP stated, titles like Borderlands or Demons' Souls favor from them a lot but some genres are better off without them in the long run. Besides RPGs, I play a lot of fighting games and I honestly don't think role-playing elements fit anywhere in the genre and even if some shooters have done good mixes, the ones that don't tend to be better in the end. Halo, Team Fortress 2, Counter-Strike, etc are better and more competitive/deep shooters without the real use of RPG elements.

But in RPGs themselves, I usually favor Japanese ones over western titles. I just find the art, styles and gameplay more appealing. Western RPGs fall into either the medieval style (The Witcher, Elder Scrolls, etc) or the deep-space sci-fi one (Mass Effect, KOTOR), while the Japanese games dare to be more fantasy-based and even mix technology and magic in the same world, resulting in some very awesome universes to play in.
 

Keriaku

Balamb Garden Freshman
Oct 26, 2013
30
11
26
#26
I'm pretty big on RPG mechanics. When I sit down to play a game, I'm looking to make progress in something (most felt with RPG mechanics) and to absorb a character/story/world (most found in RPG games). Not to mention I mostly listen to video game music, where RPGs is one of the only genres to consistently focus on.

I can enjoy games without RPG mechanics, but its rare. There has to be some kind of hook, or tangible progress to be felt. My worst compatibility is with open world, do-what-you-want type games (such as Minecraft).
 

APZonerunner

Network Boss-man
Administrator
UFFSite Veteran
Site Staff
Jul 25, 2013
1,134
925
29
Solihull, UK
www.rpgsite.net
#27
I'm pretty big on RPG mechanics. When I sit down to play a game, I'm looking to make progress in something (most felt with RPG mechanics) and to absorb a character/story/world (most found in RPG games). Not to mention I mostly listen to video game music, where RPGs is one of the only genres to consistently focus on.

I can enjoy games without RPG mechanics, but its rare. There has to be some kind of hook, or tangible progress to be felt. My worst compatibility is with open world, do-what-you-want type games (such as Minecraft).
The funny thing is, Minecraft structurally becomes a lot like an RPG, the deeper you go. That was what made me fall in love with it.
 
#28
Minecraft is also a horror survival game if you think about it.

You're typically alone and stranded in this peculiar block world usually armed with no more than say, a spade to begin with, and your life depends on your ability to manually toil in the daylight with little rest for a variety of resources from stone to food, then to construct a half-decent shelter with a weapon just in case before you're mobbed to death at the dead of night.

Now that I think about it, Minecraft is an oddity for me. I like to experience things that have at least some semblance of structure and the sense that 12 hours of game time later, I can detect that I'm a far more capable character than I was at the very beginning. I suppose Minecraft has a bit of that (if you're still alive and you've turned your initial stone-walled bunker into Tutankhamen's palace, then good job!), but a lot of the time I prefer to be in creative mode where I just let loose the crazed architect in me. Creative mode has no end goal. I don't even set myself an end goal. If I suddenly want to reconstruct the campus of my high school or build a blocky Voltron one day, I can.

I don't think RPG elements should be too pervasive; there are instances when an EXP system is halfheartedly shoehorned into a game without much purpose. Would elements like an EXP system bring anything substantial to the game? Can the game still essentially play the same way without it? If the answer seems to be yes, and there's been no proper thought into how you intertwine the feature to tailor the game, then it doesn't warrant the feature. I'm playing a fairly linear action-adventure. Why does it matter if I'm level 12 now? Does it mean anything tangible, or is this number here attempting to fool me into thinking there's depth behind it? Now I can't think of an instance where shoehorning RPG elements have ruined anything (I don't play competitive multiplayer shooters so I can't fully attest about that, but I can imagine why RPG elements can be a very double-edged sword), so it's nothing more than a little observation of mine rather than mild irritation of a sort.